6 Important Myths Vs Facts on Yes on M

6 Important Myths vs Facts on Yes on M

We are concerned about the misleading information from the Stanford No on M campaign. We want to reiterate, unequivocally, that Yes on M is essential to protect our quality of life and save our neighborhoods from additional traffic.  

Two large office projects - nearly 8 football fields of offices – are about to be built on El Camino. These will bring thousands of additional of cars to the heart of our town.

Yes on M limits the size - and accompanying commuter traffic of the office developments, to nearly half. This protects neighborhoods from rush hour and cut-through traffic. 

Instead of vacant lots, or mega-offices, Yes on M promotes local shops, dining and services for residents.

Developers are trying to distract people by putting out misleading information. These are scare tactics of the developers. They threaten that if we don't give them a sweetheart deal, they will build something even more appalling for our community.  

That's what they always say to get their way.

Remember, this is our town and our home.  Please Vote Yes on M to protect our neighborhoods,

For more details, read on.  

Sincerely,

Patti Fry, former Menlo Park Planning Commission Chair and the SaveMenlo volunteers

Here are the facts:

1. Traffic

Facts: The worst traffic problems in Menlo Park are due to office commuters at peak hours. The construction of mega office buildings in the heart of our small town— as now allowed by the Downtown Specific Plan—will inevitably lead to heavier rush hour congestion and more cut-through traffic in our neighborhoods. By capping the amount of office space and overall development along El Camino, Yes on M will reduce rush hour traffic. 

2. Medical

Facts: Yes on M limits the maximum development of offices, including medical offices, in the downtown area. This reduces traffic. If our community wants additional reductions to the amount allowed for medical or any other type of office, the Council has the ability to impose those restrictions. Measure M does not prevent the City Council from taking additional actions that protect our community. 

3. Development along El Camino Real.
Facts:  The Stanford property was leased out under a 50 year lease to AutoNation – until last year.  That’s why that had been vacant. You’ve seen that new development along El Camino has already begun and will continue under Yes on M. However, instead of being confronted for decades by massive office buildings best suited to a big city, Yes on M will ensure that Menlo Park will attract true mixed-use developments designed to enhance its small-town ambiance.

4. Schools
Facts: The City Council’s own study concluded that Yes on M will have no impact on school revenues, expenditures, or enrollment.

5. Council maintains control over big box retail, housing, and parking
Facts: Measure M requires a public vote if, and only if, the City Council decides it wants to change the amended Plan’s development caps or what counts as open space. Every other requirement and guideline in the 356-page Plan remains unchanged and under the Council’s control.  They make decisions about housing, big box retail, medical office space, surface parking, and approvals of public safety facilities such as fire stations. Under Yes on M, voters will never be asked to approve a specific project.

6. Open space.
Facts: The Vision that was supposed to guide the Downtown Specific Plan allowed for higher density in exchange for more public open space. Instead, a Plan loophole allows developers to count private rooftops and balconies as open space. Yes on M closes this loophole and ensures that required open space is just that—space open to the public. 

Vote Yes On M To Protect Our Neighborhoods

 

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